16 Comments

  1. iguanapunk on October 5, 2018 at 2:46 am

    I enjoyed seeing your back while you were showing the folding, very helpful /s



  2. Kelly Norris on October 5, 2018 at 2:50 am

    This is awesome… I will start doing this tomorrow because I’m going on a business trip and always struggle keeping things looking pressed.



  3. Tom Long on October 5, 2018 at 2:53 am

    Thanks. Always good to hear reports from "the field"



  4. Doug Dyment on October 5, 2018 at 3:03 am

    This is a better attempt than others I’ve seen, but it still gets some things wrong. Most egregious is the core object. This should be as described on OneBag.com, not a sort of rag-tag collection of items. Otherwise, you don’t get the smooth surface necessary to avoid wrinkles. It also doesn’t let you apply the proper tension to wrapped items. What’s shown here is probably fine for the type of casual clothing being used, but wouldn’t work very well for dressy clothes, or fabrics like linen, etc.



  5. jtgamm on October 5, 2018 at 3:05 am

    Useful technique! Thank you. I’m going on my first business trip and this was just what I was looking for.



  6. stringbean1971 on October 5, 2018 at 3:07 am

    thanks. this was MUCH clearer and easier to understand than the diagram on onebag’s site …!



  7. TheDD563 on October 5, 2018 at 3:10 am

    packing should be done IN the bag so there is no wasted space



  8. Tom Long on October 5, 2018 at 3:13 am

    @jtgamm Hope you have a prosperous journey.



  9. PurdyBear1 on October 5, 2018 at 3:14 am

    I use a similar method to this and it really works well.



  10. Doug Dyment on October 5, 2018 at 3:15 am

    This is a better attempt than others I’ve seen, but it still gets some things wrong. Most egregious is the core object. This should be as described on OneBag.com, not a sort of rag-tag collection of items. Otherwise, you don’t get the smooth surface necessary to avoid wrinkles. It also doesn’t let you apply the proper tension to wrapped items. What’s shown here is probably fine for the type of casual clothing being used, but wouldn’t work very well for dressy clothes, or fabrics like linen, etc.



  11. Doug Dyment on October 5, 2018 at 3:15 am

    This is a better attempt than others I’ve seen, but it still gets some things wrong. Most egregious is the core object. This should be as described on OneBag, not a sort of random collection of items. Otherwise, you don’t get the smooth surface necessary to avoid wrinkles. It also doesn’t let you apply the proper tension to wrapped items. What’s shown here is probably fine for the type of casual clothing being used, but wouldn’t work very well for dressy clothes, or fabrics like linen, etc.



  12. Tom Long on October 5, 2018 at 3:16 am

    @PhoenixSF90 Have a good trip



  13. Doug Dyment on October 5, 2018 at 3:24 am

    This is a better attempt than others I’ve seen, but it still gets some things wrong. Most egregious is the core object. This should be as described on OneBag.com, not a sort of random collection of items. Otherwise, you don’t get the smooth surface necessary to avoid wrinkles. It also doesn’t let you apply the proper tension to wrapped items. What’s shown here is probably fine for the type of casual clothing being used, but wouldn’t work very well for dressy clothes, or fabrics like linen, etc.



  14. TheDD563 on October 5, 2018 at 3:25 am

    packinglightdotcom has THE definitive video on this subject



  15. Allie Hanichak on October 5, 2018 at 3:28 am

    Thank you. Vid really helped



  16. keiphyn on October 5, 2018 at 3:38 am

    Thank you for the video! It really helps make sense of the written directions on onebag.com